ITC544 – Computer Organisation and Architecture Assignment Help

Assessment item 1
Assessment Item 1: PeerWise
Value: 10%
Due Date: 14-Dec-2018
Return Date: Not returned
Length:
Submission method options: Alternative submission method
Task
ITC544 Assessment item 1: PeerWise (Value: 10%)
Submission Method: Using the PeerWise website
Submission Due: 14-Dec-2018 11:59 pm AEDT
For this assessment item, you need to register in the PeerWise system. We will be using
PeerWise as a place for you to create, share, answer, and evaluate multiple-choice questions
with your classmates. You may start by visiting the PeerWise website at :
http://peerwise.cs.auckland.ac.nz/at/?csu_au
If you have not used PeerWise before, just click the “Registration” link and follow the prompts.
All you need to do is choose a username (students are advised to use their CSU usernames, if
possible) and a password for your PeerWise account.
If you have used PeerWise before, simply log in and then select “Join course” from the Home
menu.
To access the Assessment Item 1, “ITC544 201890”, you will need to enter two pieces of
information:
1) Course ID = To be provided in the Interact2 site – Announcement
2) Identifier = Please enter your CSU Student ID for this course
Using PeerWise, please engage yourself in the peer learning and teaching activities with your
fellow classmates by posting maximum 10 multiple-choice questions on (i) the Reading
material uploaded in the Resource Section of Interact Site (Introduction to computers), (ii)
Textbook Chapter 1: Introduction (sections 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 and 1.8), and (iii) Textbook
Chapter 2: Data representation (sections 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, and 2.6).
Furthermore, you need to answer questions and post comments on questions/answers posted
by the other students. You discuss the topics with other students using the comments. You can
also rate other questions and answers posted by other students or the lecturer. This will assist
you and your lecturer assess your readiness for study in this subject. The lecturer may contact
you if you do not engage with this assessment item.
Please note, you are allowed to post MAXIMUM 10 questions on the three topics.
However, there is no restriction on the number of answers and comments you post.
Please post quality questions.
Please read the following carefully to understand how PeerWise works.
About PeerWise
PeerWise is a web-based repository of multiple-choice questions with alternatives and
explanations written by students as part of their required coursework. Activities in PeerWise
include developing new questions, answering existing questions, and rating and providing
feedback on questions.
After logging in the PeerWise system, the main menu is divided into three sections entitled:
“Your questions”, “Answered Questions” and “Unanswered questions”. The role of each of
these sections is described next.
Your questions:
This section allows a student to review all of the questions they have contributed to the
system. The questions are displayed in a table with columns listing the date the question was
developed, the number of responses, and the rating. The table can be sorted on any of these
keys. A specific item can be selected from the table, to display details such as how often each
alternative was selected and any feedback provided by students who have answered it. There
is also a column in the table which displays the perceived difficulty of the question, as rated by
students who have answered it. Another column displays whether or not the question is
“suitable”, which occurs when it has a rating greater than 2, and the most popular alternative
selected is the correct alternative. If either of these conditions is not met, it may indicate that
the question is overly tricky, or contains errors.
When creating a new question, the contributor needs to provide a question stem, at least two
and up to five alternatives, an indication of which alternative is correct, and an explanation of
why that is the correct alternative. The explanation is shown to all students who answer the
question and serves to assist students who select an incorrect alternative to identify their
misunderstanding. Each new question can be tagged with the name of any relevant course
topics, which allows students using the system for revision to easily find questions of interest.
As soon as a question is contributed, it will appear in the “Unanswered questions” section for
other students in the course.
Unanswered questions:
Each question in the system is available to every student in the course. The unanswered
questions are organised into a table that can be sorted by the order they were developed, or
by the number of responses they have received, or by the rating they have been given. Once a
student selects a specific item to answer, the question stem and the alternatives for that
question are displayed. The student then selects the alternative they believe to be correct, at
which point they will be shown the correct alternative, as suggested by the author of the
question, as well as a histogram of all students’ responses to the question. The explanation
provided by the author is also displayed, along with any comments previously written by other
students. In addition, a simple metric is used to approximate whether the selected answer is
actually correct. The selected alternative is deemed to be correct if it agrees with the answer
suggested by the author, and if this alternative is also the most popular amongst all previous
responses. After receiving this feedback, the student who answered the question has an
opportunity to rate it and provide open-ended feedback. The rating scale is an integer
between 0 and 5, and is expected to take into account the quality of the question, the
distractors and the explanation. The student is also able to rate the difficulty of the question as
either “easy”, “medium” or “hard”. Once a question has been answered and rated, it will
always be available for review by the student in the “Answered questions” section.
Answered questions:
All previously answered questions are available and can be reviewed at any time. As other
students provide responses, the accuracy of the correctness metric improves. The table that
displays the answered questions can be sorted by the order in which the questions were
answered, by the total number of responses to the question, or by the question rating.
A basic leaderboard is also available, which ranks students contributions. It was included to
provide some motivation for participation well beyond the minimum requirements for
assessment. Tables on the leaderboard display the top rated questions, and rank students on
the number of questions they have answered, the popularity of the questions they have
contributed, and the popularity of any open-ended comments they have written during the
rating process.
Rationale
This assessment task will work towards assessing the following learning outcome/s:
• be able to demonstrate and appropriately use computer organisation and architecture
terminologies.
• be able to apply an understanding of data representations and calculations to
practical situations.
• be able to investigate, evaluate and communicate general trends in computing
technologies including examples of leading edge developments.
This assessment item has been designed to increase the peer to peer interaction among
students as a way to learn and teach each other and to incorporate collaborative learning and
teaching. Involving students in the development of questions on topics puts the educational
process in focus and empowers students by providing a greater degree of control in reflection,
peer assessment, and deep learning. Discussing the construction of questions helps to
demystify the assessment of learning outcomes and provides insight into how course
objectives are being measured. In addition, providing good feedback is a critical aspect to
effective learning. Moreover, commenting and evaluating other students’ questions engages
students in a deeper and richer learning experience. This is also an opportunity to self-assess
your readiness to engage with this subject.
Marking criteria and standards
Marks will be awarded based on PeerWise system generated reports. PeerWise generates
reports on participation summary, student scores, and student badges.
Participation summary: This shows how many questions, answers and comments are posted
by all students within a time period.
Student scores: As students participate with and contribute to PeerWise, they accumulate
two independent scores:
• a Reputation score
• an Answer score
The Reputation score is composed of three components. The first component is for question
authoring, the second component is for answering questions, and the third component is for
rating questions they have answered. A given student’s component scores increase whenever
the actions of other students generally agree with that student’s earlier decisions. In this
sense, to accumulate high component scores, a student is encouraged to make thoughtful
contributions as early as possible (which are therefore more likely to agree with the decisions
that other students make later on). The total Reputation score is calculated using a formula
that combines the component scores such that to achieve a high total score it is much better
to have good scores for each component rather than a very high score in just one (or two)
components. The lowest possible Reputation score is 1 (every student starts with a score of 1).
The Answer score increases every time the student submits an answer that is “correct” (in the
sense that it agrees with the author’s suggested answer or is the most popular answer) and it
decreases each time an incorrect answer is submitted. In general, the Answering score should
be very approximately 10 times the number of correct answers that are submitted by the
student.
Student badges: As students participate and contribute to PeerWise, they can earn certain
badges (Basic badges: A-H, Standard badges: I-P, and Elite badges: Q-Y). The report
summarises the number of badges that each students has earned, as well as listing the
individual badges.
As you write and explain, answer, rate and provide feedback on questions about the the
Reading material and the Textbook chapters you will be demonstrating the depth of your
learning and engagement related to computer systems terminologies, organisation and
architecture, data representation, and general trends in computing technologies. This will be
reflected in the scores you receive for each component.

Assessment item 2
Assignment 1: Data Representation & Digital Logic
Value: 15%
Due Date: 06-Jan-2019
Return Date: 25-Jan-2019
Length:
Submission method options: Alternative submission method
Task
Total marks: 30
Answer the following Questions
Question 1
Convert the followings: [a, b, c and d: 1 mark each; e: 3 marks. Total 7 marks]
a. 0x2ED1 to Binary
b. −29.6610 to Binary
c. 1001111001102 to Hexadecimal
d. 11101110 (8-bit 2’s complement representation) to decimal
e. A computer stores the following using the IEEE754 single precision format. What value in
decimal it is representing for:
1 01111110 11000000000000000000000
Question 2.
a) Name two universal gates. Use any one of them to design an inverter. [4 marks]
b) There are three components in a course: Quiz (Q), Assignment (A), and Journal (J). You pass
the course (P) only if you pass any two or more components. Draw the truth table and design a
minimized combinational circuit to show the concept. [12 marks = 4+4+4]
Question 3
Construct the truth table and find minimized Boolean function from the logic diagram
depicted below. [7 marks = 3+4]
Rationale
This assessment task will assess the following learning outcome/s:
• be able to apply an understanding of data representations and calculations to
practical situations.
• be able to apply Boolean algebra and digital logic to design and interpret complex
digital circuits.
This assessment task covers topic 2 and 3, and has been designed to ensure that you are
engaging with the subject content on a regular basis.

Assessment item 3
Plagiarism Quiz
Value: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
Due Date: 23-Dec-2018
Return Date: Not returned
Length:
Submission method options: Interact2 Test
Task
Undertake and complete the online quiz covering questions related to plagiarism and
referencing.
Students may attempt the Plagiarism Quiz multiple times in order to achieve the passing score
of 18 from 20. The quiz will remain open until the end of week 6. We strongly encourage all
students to complete and pass this quiz prior to submitting other assessments.
Rationale
This assessment task does not directly assess a specific learning outcome but is a requirement
for passing the subject.
To ensure students are aware of plagiarism and referencing standards.
Marking criteria and standards
Students must obtain a mark of at least 18 from 20 in order to pass this quiz. Failure in this quiz
will automatically lead to a fail grade for the subject irrespective of the marks obtained in all
other assessments.
Assessment item 4
Assignment 2: MARIE and ISA
Value: 15%
Due Date: 25-Jan-2019
Return Date: 18-Feb-2019
Length:
Submission method options: Alternative submission method
Task
Total marks: 30
Question 1:
A digital computer has a memory unit with 24 bits per word. The instruction set consists of 199
different operations. All instructions have an operation code part (opcode) and an address
part (allowing for only one address). Each instruction is stored in one word of memory. [8
marks]
1. How many bits are needed for the opcode?
2. How many bits are left for the address part of the instruction?
3. What is the maximum allowable size for memory?
4. What is the largest signed binary number that can be accommodated in one word of
memory?
Question 2:
Suppose you have the instruction “Add 900”. Given the memory as follows, the contents of AC
and the base register are 200 and 100 respectively. [6 marks]
Memory address value
800 900
900 1000
1000 500
1100 600
1200 800
1300 250
What would be loaded into the AC, if the addressing mode for the operand is:
1. Immediate
2. Direct
3. Indirect
4. Indexed
Question 3:
Write code to implement the expression: F = (A-B)*(C*D+E) on 0-address, 1-address and
2-address machines. In accordance with programming language practice, computing the
expression should not change the values of its operands. [8 marks]
Question 4:
In a computer instruction format, the instruction length is 10 bits and the size of an address
field is 3 bits. The system architect has already designed FIFTEEN 2-address instructions and
SEVEN 1-address instructions. How many 0-address instruction still possible to accommodate
for the instruction set architecture? [8 marks]
Rationale
This assessment task will assess the following learning outcome/s:
• be able to investigate the internal operation of the Central Processing Unit (CPU) and
describe how it is used to execute instructions.
• be able to investigate and describe in detail the essential elements of computer                               Presentation
File naming convention: When you upload files to the TURNITIN for this subject, please
use SUBJECT CODE, SURNAME, STUDENT ID, ASSESSMENT NUMBER, SESSION. For
example – ITC544 PATEL 11554466 A2 201890.doc
Please also adhere to the following formatting rules:
1. Please compose the answers in a document file (doc or docx format). Please do not submit
in pdf formats. Please upload the document in the TURNITIN within the deadline.
2. You may put the mas file and document file in a folder, compress the folder and upload the
compressed file to the TURNITIN. You may also upload the two files separately.
3. The first page (cover page) of the document file should have the following information
clearly mentioned:
a. Your full name
b. Your Student ID
c. Subject Code (ITC544)
d. Assessment item number and name (Assignment 2: MARIE & ISA)
4. Each page should have page numbers in “page x of y” format (including the cover page).
5. You DO NOT need to provide any references for any of the questions.

Assessment item 5
Online Quiz
Value: 10%
Due Date: 10-Feb-2019
Return Date: Not returned
Length: 20 minutes
Submission method options: Interact2 Test
Task
The Online Quiz covers all topics of the subject. The online quiz will be activated on 01 Feb
2019 and will be closed on 10 Feb 2019. You may attempt the online quiz as many times you
wish, and the highest score will be taken. Each time you will have 20 multiple choice questions
(randomly selected by the system from a large question pool), and you will receive 20 minutes
to finish it. Attempting online quiz many times will help you to prepare for the final exam too,
as you will have a similar type of multiple choice questions in the exam.
In order to permit quick return to all students, extensions and late submissions are not
possible.
Rationale
This assessment task will assess the following learning outcome/s:
• be able to demonstrate and appropriately use computer organisation and architecture
terminologies.
• be able to apply an understanding of data representations and calculations to
practical situations.
• be able to apply Boolean algebra and digital logic to design and interpret complex
digital circuits.
• be able to investigate the internal operation of the Central Processing Unit (CPU) and
describe how it is used to execute instructions.
• be able to investigate and describe in detail the essential elements of computer
organisation including internal bus, memory, Input/Output ( I/O) organisations and
interfacing standards and discuss how these elements function.
• be able to discuss various programming tools available and their relationship to the
architecture.
• be able to investigate, evaluate and communicate general trends in computing
technologies including examples of leading edge developments.
This assessment task covers all topics, and has been designed to ensure that you are engaging
with the subject content on a regular basis.
Marking criteria and standards
The Online Quiz will be marked by the Interact2 test centre system and you will receive
feedback after the due date. Marks will be awarded based on your ability to select the best
option from the available choices to demonstrate your ability to use computer system
terminologies, and identify the essential elements of computer organisation and how they
function, various input/output systems of a computer, the various programming tools
available and their relationship to the computer architecture, and the application of Boolean
algebra and digital logic to the understanding of computer operation. Student will get marks
according to the following scales:
HD – At least 85% answers were correct
DI – At least 75% answers were correct
CR – At least 65% answers were correct
PS – At least 50% answers were correct
FL- Less than 50% answers were correct
Requirements

Assessment item 6
Final Exam
Value: 50%
Due Date: To be advised
Duration: 2 hours
Submission method options: N/A – submission not required/applicable
Requirements
• This is a closed book exam.
• NO calculators are allowed in this exam.
• The final exam will cover all the subject material.
• The Final examination consists of two parts, Part A: multiple choice questions (MCQs),
and Part B: short answer questions.
• Part A consists of 25 MCQs. Students are required to answer all of them.
• Part B consists of four (4) questions. Students are required to answer maximum three
(3) of them.
• Each question of part B will be a combination of a number of short questions selected
from different topics. Please see the sample exam question posted on the Interact site.
• Total marks: 100 marks, Time: 2 hours writing time, 10 minutes reading time. (writing
is permitted during the reading time.)
Rationale
This assessment task will assess the following learning outcome/s:
• be able to demonstrate and appropriately use computer organisation and architecture
terminologies.
• be able to apply an understanding of data representations and calculations to
practical situations.
• be able to apply Boolean algebra and digital logic to design and interpret complex
digital circuits.
• be able to investigate the internal operation of the Central Processing Unit (CPU) and
describe how it is used to execute instructions.
• be able to investigate and describe in detail the essential elements of computer
organisation including internal bus, memory, Input/Output ( I/O) organisations and
interfacing standards and discuss how these elements function.
• be able to discuss various programming tools available and their relationship to the
architecture.
• be able to investigate, evaluate and communicate general trends in computing
technologies including examples of leading edge developments.
The final exam will assess students’ understanding of the fundamental concepts of the subject
material; their ability to integrate and apply information from various topics; and to apply
their understanding and knowledge to simple scenario problems. Specifically the exam will
assess students’ progress towards meeting the learning outcomes.


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